Posted tagged ‘Ronald Reagan’

Radio Hosts Becoming Winning Politicians

June 1, 2014

Dan Patrick, a conservative talk radio show host and leader of the Texas state Senate’s Tea Party caucus is on track to becoming the next Texas Lieutenant Governor, the most constitutionally powerful lieutenant governor’s posts in the country.

Ronald Reagan as a radio announcer. (Archives.gov)

Ronald Reagan as a radio announcer. (Archives.gov)

Other popular talk hosts have transitioned into politics.

President Ronald Reagan’s first love was radio. As a young man he called sporting events on the radio. In later years, he gave conservative commentary on the radio. He also is in a member of the National Radio Hall of Fame.

Others who went from the broadcast booth to the ballot include current Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, former Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura and one time candidate for New York mayor Barry Farber.

From the Dallas Morning News:

State Sen. Dan Patrick has trounced incumbent David Dewhurst to win the Republican nomination — and thus become the strong favorite — to be Texas’ next lieutenant governor. …

Patrick, a radio talk-show host and businessman, negated Dewhurst’s usual money advantage. Patrick spent more than $9 million, only about $1.6 million of it his own money. That forced Dewhurst, despite the loyalties of business and trade groups cemented during his three terms as lieutenant governor, to dip into his own pocket for more than $5 million of the more than $12 million he spent.

To learn more about talkers who gained political office read The Right Frequency.

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Conservative Talker Called Gorbachev ‘Ray of Hope’ Befor Reagan’s ‘Tear Down this Wall’ Speech

June 9, 2013

(Wednesday June 12 will mark the anniversary of President Reagan’s historical challenge to Soviet leader Gorbachev to “tear down” the Berlin Wall.” Below is an excerpt from The Right Frequency, an Amazon Best Seller, of legendary talk radio host Barry Farber’s commentary in a Soviet publication months before Reagan’s immortal words.)

Later that same year, the prestigious weekly Soviet newspaper Literaturnaya Gazeta published Farber’s denunciation of Soviet communism, and Soviet crimes unedited, but with a response from the newspaper’s political editor Alexander Sabov.

The Soviet paper put a preface on the Farber op-ed, warning readers:

“Our correspondent in the USA has dictated to our editorial office alongside the article of Barry Farber the following note: ‘On your request, I am sending to you the article of the zealous advocate of the Truman Doctrine.

The author is a well-known publicist of ultraconservative outlooks. On New York radio an announcement on the unprecedented proposal for an adversary of the Soviet Union to write in Literaturnaya Gazetta was transmitted. If now the publication does not take place or is printed abridged a scandal would be fanned in the local press (in New York).’ We print a word-for-word translation of B. Farber’s article not because we fear
scandal, of course. It was in the essence of our editorial intention to give our readers a chance to get acquainted in the original with the stereotypes of anti-Sovietism and a concrete proof of the old way of thinking, which is clearly outdated in our time.”
Farber wrote that despite U.S. efforts to contain the spread of communism “it is less safe there (in Western Europe) than in 1947 because of the all-powerful Soviet military.”

He wrote that Soviet control of Eastern Europe and installing Communist dictators in Angola, Mozambique, Ethiopia, Cuba and Nicaragua ended the goodwill the two nations had during World War II.

“We loved the Soviet Union when it was our partner in the fight against Hitler. It would be good to love you again,” Farber wrote. He added that reforms proposed by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev’s reform efforts, “gave us, too, a ray of hope and a little warmth in our hearts.”

Farber admitted to being impressed the Soviet paper did not censor him. “I listed every Soviet crime I could fit in. The Berlin blockade, the repression of the Hungarian revolt, the invasion of Czechoslovakia, the downing of KAL flight 007, the refusal to let Jews and others leave the Soviet Union, the invasion of Afghanistan, the takeover of the Baltic states. I called the role of all the Soviet crimes,” he said. “I didn’t think they would actually print it. Actually, their preface to my article was rather mild. … I am flattered, encouraged and impressed. But I will be more impressed when a Soviet writer can write the Literary Gazette and get it printed then get a call from a Politburo member saying ‘Your politics are all wet but let me buy you a beer.’”

Click here to order The Right Frequency.

Talk Radio and Ronald Reagan’s First Campaign

June 4, 2013

(The following is an excerpt from The Right Frequency.)

Before Bob Grant became a real celebrity out of New York, the producer of his Los Angeles program on KABC got a call from public relations firm that wanted to book Ronald Reagan as a guest.

“My producer, a nice young fellow from Inglewood, N.J. as a matter of fact, he said, ‘Bob doesn’t do show business stuff. We’re dealing mostly with politics and current events,’” Grant recalled.

The PR guy asserted, “Maybe you don’t know, but Ronald Reagan is not going to talk about his latest movie. He doesn’t make moves any more. He’s running for governor.’ When my producer told me I said get him, by all means. Get Ronald Reagan. I was already a fan of Reagan. I had heard several of his speeches or read them.”

“So Reagan was booked and it turned out to be his first radio interview as a gubernatorial candidate. I kept him for two hours. He was only supposed to be on for one,” Grant said.

Grant said Reagan, seeking his first political office, fumbled on more than a few questions, but Grant, being a fan, covered for him.

“We even had a woman call from Pasadena and say ‘You two ought to change places.’ She wanted to vote for Governor [Edmund G.] Brown,” Grant said. “She didn’t like the fact that I was helping Ronald Reagan. When she said, ‘You two guys ought to change places,’ Ronald Reagan, such a wonderful human being, says, ‘You know, you might have a good point there.’ That in retrospect has turned out to be my most memorable interview.”

That is saying something for a man who has been on the radio for six decades.
More than two decades later, another California radio announcer would travel to New York to be on the same station as Grant.

When an upstart Rush Limbaugh left Sacramento to come to WABC in New York, the excitement of the move was soon blunted when seemingly none of his callers wanted to talk about what Rush was talking about.

“I wasn’t just going to do a national show. I had to do a local show for two hours a day on WABC as well, because they weren’t going to carry the national show at first,” Limbaugh explained. “And, folks, I can’t tell you how dispirited I got the first month.
Here I am doing my show, and I’m doing my thing, and every phone call I got wanted to talk about what Bob Grant had said the day before. I’m on from ten a.m. to noon, and I’m sitting there saying, ‘Are you people not listening to me?’”

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

GOP Historian: The Right Frequency ‘An Excellent Book’

May 26, 2013

Republican party historian Michael Zak recently hailed The Right Frequency as “an excellent book,” on his website, Grand Old Partisan.

“From pioneers such as Walter Winchell to Rush Limbaugh and beyond — they’re all RIGHT here,” Zak writes.

Zak, is the author of Back to Basics for the Republican Party, that chronicles the GOP’s heritage of free people and free markets from President Lincoln through President Reagan and beyond.

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

 

Soviet Union Clash with Talk Radio Legend

May 12, 2013

(The following is an excerpt from The Right Frequency.)

A significant enough a voice on the right, Barry Farber penned an op-ed in The New York Times rallying to the defense of President Reagan by
1987, then embattled by the Iran Contra scandal.
“Harry S. Truman probably could not have identified the six republics that make up Yugoslavia, but his decision to jump to the aid of Marshal Tito accelerated the fragmentation of the Soviet bloc,” Farber wrote in the Times. “The notion of a President helping a Communist in 1948 makes the sale of arms to Iran today seem like an embassy party cookie push.”

“I happen to value Ronald Regan’s Kennedy-like ability to inspire, his Ike-like ability to be the genial daddy of the mall, his Trumanesque toughness to tyrants in all words and some deeds, his Nixon-like willingness to try bold foreign policy initiatives and his Rooseveltian knack of remaining popular through it all,” Farber wrote. “Call me wrong, even doltish, but I feel a new pride in this country, a new respect for this country, a new hesitancy in Moscow to commit aggression, a welcome paralysis among Moscow’s client states to pursue subversion, and economic optimism to match a rising Dow.”

Later that same year, the prestigious weekly Soviet newspaper Literaturnaya Gazeta published Farber’s denunciation of Soviet communism,
and Soviet crimes unedited, but with a response from the newspaper’s political editor Alexander Sabov.

The Soviet paper put a preface on the Farber op-ed, warning readers:

“Our correspondent in the USA has dictated to our editorial office alongside the article of Barry Farber the following note: ‘On your request, I am sending to you the article of the zealous advocate of the Truman Doctrine.

The author is a well-known publicist of ultraconservative outlooks. On New York radio an announcement on the unprecedented proposal for an adversary of the Soviet Union to write in Literaturnaya Gazetta was transmitted. If now the publication does not take place or is printed abridged a scandal would be fanned in the local press (in New York).’ We print a word-for-word translation of B. Farber’s article not because we fear
scandal, of course. It was in the essence of our editorial intention to give our readers a chance to get acquainted in the original with the stereotypes of anti-Sovietism and a concrete proof of the old way of thinking, which is clearly outdated in our time.”
Farber wrote that despite U.S. efforts to contain the spread of communism “it is less safe there (in Western Europe) than in 1947 because of the all-powerful Soviet military.” He wrote that Soviet control of Eastern Europe and installing Communist dictators in Angola, Mozambique, Ethiopia, Cuba and Nicaragua ended the goodwill the two nations had during World War II. “We loved the Soviet Union when it was our partner in the fight against Hitler. It would be good to love you again,” Farber wrote. He added that reforms proposed by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev’s reform efforts, “gave us, too, a ray of hope and a little warmth in our hearts.”

Farber admitted to being impressed the Soviet paper did not censor him. “I listed every Soviet crime I could fit in. The Berlin blockade,
the repression of the Hungarian revolt, the invasion of Czechoslovakia, the downing of KAL flight 007, the refusal to let Jews and
others leave the Soviet Union, the invasion of Afghanistan, the takeover of the Baltic states. I called the role of all the Soviet
crimes,” he said. “I didn’t think they would actually print it. Actually, their preface to my article was rather mild. … I am flattered, encouraged
and impressed. But I will be more impressed when a Soviet writer can write the Literary Gazette and get it printed then get a
call from a Politburo member saying ‘Your politics are all wet but let me buy you a beer.’”

Farber was on the forefront of ABC Radio’s effort in the early 1990s to create a national stable of talkers called Talknet. After that fell apart, Farber joined Michael Castello and Alan Colmes to help form a new network called Daynet. For a while, he co-hosted a debate show with Colmes, pre-Hannity, called “Left to Right.”

Talkers Magazine called Daynet “one of the forerunners of today’s independent talk syndication scene.” He continues to do a weekend program on Talk Radio Network.

Farber, a household name to New York radio listeners for decades, didn’t actually reach a national audience until 1990. But then he was initially heard outside of New York on his one-hour weekend show carried by the Talk Radio Network, and he filled in for other weekday hosts.

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

Click here for a special limited time offer on The Right Frequency for Kindle.

Lynn Woolley Show Talks About The Right Frequency’s Story of Radio from H.V. Kaltenborn to Rush Limbaugh

February 16, 2013

Book Cover

The Lynn Woolley Show, which is broadcast across Texas featured The Right Frequency author Fred V. Lucas on the program Friday.

They talked about well known radio legends in the current era such as Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity of today.

Further, they discussed radio icons of a previous era such as H.V. Kaltenborn and Walter Winchell.

Woolley, who co-authored a book on the Fairness Doctrine, talked about the FCC rule with Lucas. The Right Frequency details how President Lyndon Johnson used the ‘Challenge and Harass” strategy against conservatives on the radio to silence critics. The Right Frequency also features an interview with President Ronald Reagan’s FCC Chairman Mark Fowler, who dismantled the Fairness Doctrine in the 1980s.

Click here for the program.

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

Ed Koch vs. Barry Farber: Legendary Mayor’s First Victory Detailed in The Right Frequency

February 10, 2013

Former New York Mayor Ed Koch, who passed away earlier this month, was a legendary political figure. Barry Farber was a legendary talk radio host in the Big Apple, whose voice dominated the powerful WOR throughout the 1960s and 1970s.  The two larger-than-life figures would face off in 1977, when Koch was seeking his first term as mayor.  Farber was interviewed in The Right Frequency: The Story of the Talk Radio Giants Who Shook Up the Political and Media Establishment by Fred V. Lucas (History Publishing Co.). Farber talked about the mayor’s race against Koch and his other adventures in radio. Below is an excerpt from The Right Frequency that details Koch’s first mayoral victory over legendary New York talk radio host Barry Farber. Farber was interviewed in The Right Frequency about his mayoral campaign and other adventures behind the microphone.

Covering a quarter of WOR’s airtime was enough exposure to give [Barry Farber] political aspirations. He exited radio in 1977 to run for mayor of New York City. He initially sought the Republican nomination, but before the primary, the Conservative Party nominated him, putting him in company with William F. Buckley, the Conservative Party candidate for New York mayor in 1965. The difference is that Buckley famously said the first thing he do if he won was demand a recount. Farber had a strategy for winning.

“There was a real scenario for victory,” Farber said. “Let me explain. We could see in the year 1977 that conservatism was rising. Reagan was elected three years later. Our strategy was to pull an insurgency on the very liberal New York City Republican establishment, run against the Republican establishment candidate. Try to get that nomination. Then hope that the Democrats did what they always do and did up until that year. They always, in their primary, had 15 percent of the eligible voters voting and they always voted with the leftmost candidate.”

“If that had taken place, then [former U.S. Representative] Bella Abzug would have been the Democratic candidate,” Farber continued. “If both parts of the plan had worked-actually neither worked, I got 42 percent for the Republican nomination for mayor—but if I had gotten the Republican nomination and Bella Abzug had been
the Democrat, I’d have won. I had the Conservative Party line too. If I had the Conservative and Republican and Bella were the Democrat, that was a real scenario. It was a long shot, but every Sunday long shots are thrown, they call them hail marries and some are caught.”

State Senator Roy Goodman won the Republican primary, but Farber did win more than four out of 10 Republican voters over, which was better than expected. The race was tight in most boroughs, but Goodman trounced Farber in Manhattan. Farber continued his fight into November carrying the Conservative banner.

Farber opposed racial quotas, gay rights laws and supported stricter laws for school truancy. Farber, by the way did not give an advantage to Democratic nominee Ed Koch, by dividing the Republican ticket. Koch was fending off Liberal Party mayoral nominee Mario Cuomo. Polls eventually showed it was essentially a race between Koch and Cuomo. On Election Day, Koch won the four-man race with 49 percent of the vote. Farber and Goodman got only about 5 percent each.