Archive for the ‘Roaring ’90s’ category

Monica Lewinsky and Talk Radio’s Road to Impeachment

May 11, 2014

The reemergence of Monica Lewinsky last week with the Vanity Fair essay, “Shame and Survival,” prompted plenty of chatter on talk radio, as it sounded like a throwback to the 1990s hearing Rush Limbaugh explain the entire scandal was not about sex but about perjury and corruption in the White House.

Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

“They’re discarded after being used. And if they dare speak up at the wrong time and the wrong place, they get destroyed not just discarded. There’s Hillary. Monica Lewinsky is making the point that it was Hillary blaming all the women that were involved, including her. Lewinsky, she says she considered suicide. So Hillary and Bill… I mean, War on Women?” Rush said.

The Right Frequency explains “radio’s road to impeachment” in Chapter 8, detailing how Limbaugh, G. Gordon Liddy and other talkers fanned the flames and built public pressure that ultimately led to the House impeaching President Bill Clinton.

For more information on how talk radio helped prompt the Clinton impeachment, read The Right Frequency.

 

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Medved Yawns at ‘War on Women’ Relaunch

April 23, 2014

Talk radio host Michael Medved, profiled in Chapter 8 of The Right Frequency gave a big shrug to President Barack Obama’s attempt to invoke the “War on Women” rhetoric into the 2014 campaign because contrary to public opinion, Medved explains it wasn’t effective in the 2012 campaign.

Obama

In a Wall Street Journal op-ed, Medved writes:

“True enough, Mr. Obama won the overall female vote by 11 points in 2012—55% to 44%—but that’s hardly remarkable for a Democratic presidential candidate. Al Gore fared the same in 2000, prevailing among women by an identical 11-point advantage. Mr. Obama did better with women in 2008, beating John McCain by 56% to 43%. He enjoyed that advantage even though his first campaign never emphasized “women’s issues” and despite the presence of a woman—Sarah Palin—on the Republican ticket … Regardless, the unassailable conclusion is that the campaign alleging a Republican ‘War on Women’ didn’t much work. It failed to win white women for the president and drew its results exclusively from women of color who would have supported him in any event. They didn’t need Sandra Fluke’s free birth-control demands or Mr. Romney’s clumsy “binders full of women” remark to push them into the Obama camp. Nervous Republicans should be reassured that even if their Democratic rivals double down on this nasty, silly strategy, it achieved little-to-nothing in 2012.”

To learn more about Michael Medved, read The Right Frequency.

Top 10 Again! Right Frequency Climbs Amazon List

September 7, 2013

The Right Frequency on Friday hit the #6 spot on Amazon’s History & Criticism category.

The book was also #25 in the overall radio category.

This makes four consecutive months that The Right Frequency has been on an Amazon bestseller list.

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

 

 

One Year After Release, The Right Frequency a Bestselling Radio Book

September 1, 2013

One year after its release, The Right Frequency stands strong on Amazon.

The Right Frequency, released in August 2012, reached the Top 20 over the past week on Amazon’s Radio History & Criticism category for Kindle books. This book reached the top 10 on Friday, Aug. 30. The Right Frequency also returned to the bestseller list in Amazon’s Radio category.

The Right Frequency paperback edition also returned to the bestseller list for Amazon’s History & Criticism category.

The book, that chronicles the history of talk radio from the days of Walter Winchell through Rush Limbaugh, has been an Amazon bestseller for four consecutive months.

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

Boston Globe post on National Radio Day

August 20, 2013

The Right Frequency was featured on The Boston Globe’s website in a posting about National Radio Day, Aug. 20.

Of the day, the article said, “[O]ne trend that appears obvious is the shift to talk radio away from music radio due to the demand for music being satisfied by iPods, YouTube and a variety of electronic factors.”

“And when it comes to talk radio, one of the very few experts on the subject, Fred Lucas, author of ‘The Right Frequency,’ a history of the remarkable influence talk radio has had on Conservative politics in the United States, is well aware of the trend.”

“Radio is becoming more widely used than ever before,” Lucas said. “There are more portals through radio, and I mean talk radio, flows today than ever before. When one considers the portable electronic devices in use today, the numbers are staggering. Talk radio influence appears to be never ending.”

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

Limbaugh, Hannity, Levin as GOP Moderators? If Only RNC, Candidates Had the Guts

August 17, 2013

With CNN and NBC out of the running for hosting 2016 GOP presidential primary debates, three of America’s biggest talkers could step forward, the Washington Examiner first reported this week. It would be a ratings bonanza if the candidates and the RNC have the guts to do it.

“Miffed that their candidates were singled out for personal questions or CNN John King’s ‘This or That,’ when he asked candidates quirky questions like ‘Elvis or Johnny Cash,’ GOP insiders tell Secrets that they are considering other choices, even a heavyweight panel of radio bigs Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity and Mark Levin.

“They told Secrets that they are eager to bring in questioners who understand Republican policies and beliefs and who have the ability to get candidates to differentiate their positions on core conservative values.

“The move comes as several conservatives are pressuring the party to have Limbaugh, Hannity and Levin ask the debate questions. “It makes a lot of sense. We’d get a huge viewership, they’d make a lot of news and maybe have some fun too,” said one of the advocates of the radio trio hosting debates.”

Talk radio has helped shape the outcomes of Republican presidential primaries in the past. Below is an excerpt from The Right Frequency about the role of talk radio in the 2000 Republican presidential primary.

Bill Clinton was getting little attention in his final year in office, 2000, as most of the attention was focused on the presidential race.
Hosts weighed in heavily to the Republican primary, which had become a two man race between Texas Governor George W. Bush
and Arizona Senator John McCain by the end of 1999.
Rush Limbaugh threw all his support in the 2000 primary to
Bush.
It is always impossible to know how much impact talk radio had
on primary voters, but it is certainly reasonable to view talk radio
having greater influence on a primary, when the choir seeks guidance
in making a choice, than in a general election when the choir
already knows what notes to sing and listens to the preacher for reaffirmation.
So it would be with Limbaugh’s near daily lambasting of
McCain, even more than he built up Bush.
“The way the primary system is set up today, talk radio has more
of an influence in encouraging primary voters to vote than general
election voters because talk radio has a higher audience of people
who are more in the extremes of both the left and the right,” said
Michael Harrison, editor of Talkers Magazine. “And statistics do
indicate that the turnout for primaries are more o the zealots than
the average person in the middle. Any radio show that specifically
targets the extremes is likely to galvanize voters. I would think that
talk radio has a bigger influence in primaries today than it does in
the general election.”
McCain had a mostly conservative record, but his support of
campaign finance reform was untenable to many conservatives, as
was his eagerness to “reach across the aisle” and work with
Democrats. Most Republicans liked him in spite of, not because of,
the McCain-Feingold bill. Still, because of his biography as a war
hero, a significant numbers of voters were enamored by him. The
mainstream media especially loved him, because he kept things
interesting, but also for the campaign finance reform proposal.
When McCain trounced Bush in the New Hampshire primary
by a surprising margin, it posed the question whether the inevitability
of Bush’s nomination would happen.
Limbaugh warned that even though the media is “orgasmic”
over McCain now, they are “love ’em and leave ’em liberals” if he is
the Republican nominee (a prediction given credence by the 2008
election).
One of Limbaugh’s parodies featured a McCain supporter
singing, “He’s the candidate I adore. He can keep my tax cut and I’ll
be poor. And I’ll send him more.”
The National Annenberg Election Study found that post New
Hampshire primary listening to Limbaugh negatively affected the
voters feelings about McCain. This is significant since Limbaugh’s
focus on McCain really began after the senator’s victory in New
Hampshire. The Annenberg study also found that the impression
Republican voters in Super Tuesday states had of McCain took a
negative turn after listening to Limbaugh. So there is evidence to
show that talk radio can impact the outcome of a primary election.

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

Rick Santorum Trumpets Beck, Limbaugh, Hannity as Presidential Debate Moderators

August 14, 2013

Rick Santorum, the 2012 Republican presidential candidate, voiced support for the Republican Party’s threat to yank GOP presidential primary debates from CNN and NBC.

Last week, Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus protested the two networks’ plan for feature films on likely 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. As a consequence, Priebus said he would as the full committee to approve a measure to prevent primary debates from airing on the networks.

“Look, we already as Republicans allow the media to run over us,” said Santorum, who won 11 states during the 2012 primaries, coming in second place to eventual nominee Mitt Romney. “Republicans allow moderators who will never vote for any of them to frame the debate, he said, adding, “Can you imagine a Democratic debate where Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity and Glenn Beck were the moderators?”

The Right Frequency tells about how most conservative talk radio hosts favored Santorum over Romney. The book further goes into detail about the role talkers have played in Republican presidential primaries — helping Bob Dole and George W. Bush win the nomination in 1996 and 2000. However, talk radio doesn’t hold unlimited sway over the nomination process, as was evident in 2008 and 2012.

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.