Archive for the ‘Fairness Doctrine’ category

Fear Over De Facto Fairness Doctrine

June 21, 2014

Broadcasting & Cable reports:

The House Judiciary Committee has put itself squarely in the middle of the network neutrality debate, asserting its jurisdiction in a hearing Friday—“Net Neutrality: Is Antitrust Law More Effective than Regulation in Protecting Consumers and Innovation?”—in its subcommittee on antitrust law.

LBJ (WhiteHouse.gov)

LBJ (WhiteHouse.gov)

And while the subject was network neutrality, Republicans also saw the specter of a dotcom version of the fairness doctrine in calls for FCC regulation to prevent ISPs from favoring one type of speech over another.

The Right Frequency states why its important to be on guard against the Fairness Doctrine, the former FCC regulation requiring equal time on controversial issues that was often abused by public officials – particularly by the Johnson administration, which sought to silence opposition voices on the air.

An excerpt:

The talk radio piece in The Nation ran in the May 25, 1964 issue with the headline, “Hate Clubs of the Air.” It said, “The hate clubs of the air are spewing out a minimum of 6,600 broadcasts a week, carried by more than 1,300 radio and television stations—nearly one out of every five in the nation in a blitz that saturates everyone one of the fifty states with the exception of Maine.”

According to [The Good Guys, the Bad Guys and the First Amendment by Fred Friendly], “Because of the close association of James Row with President Johnson and also because of John Bailey’s standing as chairman of the Democratic National Committee, there is little doubt that this contrived scheme had White House approval.”

Bill Ruder, an Assistant Secretary of Commerce in the Johnson administration recalled, “Our massive strategy was to use the Fairness Doctrine to challenge and harass right-wing broadcasters and hope that the challenge would be so costly to them that they would be inhibited and decide it was too expensive to continue.”

The DNC mailed out thousands of copies of Cook’s Nation article to Democratic state and local parties and Democratic officials.

The DNC also mailed the article to radio stations, with a letter from DNC counsel Dan Brightman warning that if Democrats are attacked, demands will be made for equal time.

To learn more about how the federal government bullied opposition voices, read The Right Frequency.

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Final Nail in the Coffin Just Nailed for Fairness Doctrine

May 11, 2014

Sure, the dreadful Fairness Doctrine has been gone as a government regulation since the 1980s. But one last remnant of the ridiculous, speech stifling rule remained until this week, as explained by Radio World. The FCC rejected two challenges to radio license that were made under the “Zapple Doctrine.”

“The Zapple Doctrine required that broadcast stations that give air time to the supporters of one candidate in an election give time to the supporters of competing candidates as well, according to Wilkinson Barker Knauer attorney David Oxenford. And, even though the Fairness Doctrine has been defunct for years, various manifestations have reappeared at times, he blogs,” Radio World said.

To learn more about the abuses of the Fairness Doctrine and the long fight to dismantle it, read Chapters 5 and 6 of The Right Frequency.

 

Top 10 Again! Right Frequency Climbs Amazon List

September 7, 2013

The Right Frequency on Friday hit the #6 spot on Amazon’s History & Criticism category.

The book was also #25 in the overall radio category.

This makes four consecutive months that The Right Frequency has been on an Amazon bestseller list.

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

 

 

One Year After Release, The Right Frequency a Bestselling Radio Book

September 1, 2013

One year after its release, The Right Frequency stands strong on Amazon.

The Right Frequency, released in August 2012, reached the Top 20 over the past week on Amazon’s Radio History & Criticism category for Kindle books. This book reached the top 10 on Friday, Aug. 30. The Right Frequency also returned to the bestseller list in Amazon’s Radio category.

The Right Frequency paperback edition also returned to the bestseller list for Amazon’s History & Criticism category.

The book, that chronicles the history of talk radio from the days of Walter Winchell through Rush Limbaugh, has been an Amazon bestseller for four consecutive months.

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

Boston Globe post on National Radio Day

August 20, 2013

The Right Frequency was featured on The Boston Globe’s website in a posting about National Radio Day, Aug. 20.

Of the day, the article said, “[O]ne trend that appears obvious is the shift to talk radio away from music radio due to the demand for music being satisfied by iPods, YouTube and a variety of electronic factors.”

“And when it comes to talk radio, one of the very few experts on the subject, Fred Lucas, author of ‘The Right Frequency,’ a history of the remarkable influence talk radio has had on Conservative politics in the United States, is well aware of the trend.”

“Radio is becoming more widely used than ever before,” Lucas said. “There are more portals through radio, and I mean talk radio, flows today than ever before. When one considers the portable electronic devices in use today, the numbers are staggering. Talk radio influence appears to be never ending.”

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.

‘Radio Has the Best Pictures’

August 18, 2013

A post on One News Page discussed the upcoming National Radio Day and The Right Frequency.

“Radio communication was around since the 1800s in some form, but became a commercial force in the 1920s, when commentators such as H.V. Kaltenborn ruled the airwaves. The story of these early radio voices through the current talkers such as Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck is told in “The Right Frequency: The Story of the Talk Radio Giants Who Shook Up the Political and Media Establishment” by Fred Lucas (History Publishing Co.),” the post says. 
It continues, “National Public Radio enthusiastically declared in 2011, ‘That’s right – one day is set aside to celebrate radio. At NPR, we honor it every day, but we’re happy to have an excuse to pay it extra special attention.’ Seeking to answer the question, “Why would anyone want to celebrate radio in this digital age?” NPR asserted three points: 1.) “Radio is one of the nation’s most accessible forms of media.” 2.) In times of crisis, radio can be the only source for emergency information, and 3.) Quoting NPR correspondent Susan Stamberg, “Radio has the best pictures.”
The Right Frequency explains how radio talkers spanning two centuries from Walter Winchell, Bob Grant and Sean Hannity have painted the clearest pictures, rarely leaving ambiguity on the hot political and social issues of the day.”

Radio Surived and Thrives Through Media Revolutions

August 18, 2013

Silobreaker, a publication on technology, carried a recent posting on The Right Frequency.

The article said, “The book explains how radio not only survived but thrived despite various media revolutions over the past 90s years. It also details milestones in the radio era such as the Payola Scandal of the early 1960s and the end of the FCC’s Fairness Doctrine in the late 1980s, both of which contributed in its own way to the proliferation of talk radio.”

The piece was posted just days before National Radio Day on Tuesday, Aug. 20.

Click here to order a copy of The Right Frequency.